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About Galuku Pty. Ltd.
2009 catalogue
Liquid Feed Guidelines For Roses

Fertiliser Quantities for Greenhouse Rose 100 x Concentrate Stock Solution – Run To Waste Galuku Cocopeat Media (kg/1000 L water)

  STARTER SOLUTION FOR 0-6 WEEKS STANDARD SOLUTION FOR >6 WEEKS
 
SOLUTION A
CALCIUM NITRATE 73.0 kg 70.0 kg
POTASSIUM NITRATE 10.0 kg 15.0 kg
AMMONIUM NITRATE As needed As needed
IRON CHELATES –EDTA 13% 1.1 kg 1.1 kg
 
SOLUTION B
POTASSIUM NITRATE25.0 kg25.0 kg
POTASSIUM SULPHATE5.0 kg6.0 kg
MONO POTASSIUM PHOSPHATE8.0 kg8.0 kg
MONO AMMONIUM PHOSPHATE7.0 kg7.0 kg
PHOSPHORIC ACID – 81%As neededAs needed
MAGNESIUM SULPHATE (Epsom Salt)28.0 kg30.0 kg
MANGANESE SULPHATE -32%Mn75 g75 g
ZINC SULPHATE –23%Zn60 g60 g
SODIUM BORATE –11.3%B190 g190 g
COPPER SULPHATE –25%Cu25 g25 g
SODIUM MOLYBDATE -40%Mo13 g13 g

From the above formulas, the typical nutrient element composition is outlined below when assuming standard element concentrations for each fertilizer and dilutions as outlined above.

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Nutrient element 0-6 weeks (mg/L) 6 weeks onwards (mg/L)
Nitrogen-nitrate159161
Nitrogen-ammonium88
Phosphorus3737
Potassium180204
Calcium137132
Magnesium2830
Sulphur4550
Iron1.451.45
Manganese0.240.24
Zinc0.140.14
Boron0.210.21
Copper0.060.06
Molybdenum:0.050.05
K/N ratio1.08:11.21:1

Notes – Guidelines for use:
The two formulas are designed for the individual phases of plant growth, ie vegetative growth during establish and generative growth during production.

The 0-6 week solution is designed for application prior to planting to charge the root zone environment and then for a period of approximately 6 weeks of growth to flowering. The actual time to switch to the standard formula will depend on a number conditions such as: variety, root stock, environmental conditions, irrigation management etcetera.

The 6 week onward solution is used during harvest and should be used for the rest of the cropping phase unless analysis of the production system confirms alterations are required.

With a heavy crop load or under excess vegetative growth, add an additional 5.0 kg of Potassium Nitrate to Solution A and 2.5 kg of Magnesium Sulphate to Solution B.

In periods of low light and rapid growth, the pH is likely to rise and should be counteracted via a combination of injection of acid and the use of Ammonium Nitrate at up to 2.0 kg to Solution A. To restrict nitrate as nitrogen in the liquid feed, Ammonium Sulphate could be trialled in several tanks but do not exceed 10 % ammonium as the total nitrogen concentration.

In all cases, run off solution and leaf analysis should be conducted to determine optimal nutritional management of the plants. It is advised to conduct this on a regular basis to identify trends in the nutritional uptake of plants so optimum productivity associated with good nutrition management can be realised.

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Electrical Conductivity
The electrical conductivity supplied in the drip water will depend on the phase of growth, environmental conditions, crop performance, crop load, varietal requirements etc.

The electrical conductivity of the drip water must be controlled by the grower. In hot weather, high light conditions, weak or highly generative growth use a lower electrical conductivity. With low light, cool weather, soft growth use a higher electrical conductivity. As a guide an electrical conductivity of 1.0 to 1.9 dS/m in the drip water is typically used under certain conditions.

In general, run off from the root zone should be measured and recorded. Run off readings of 1.2 to 2.6 dS/m in run off are acceptable under certain conditions. Avoid high and low electrical conductivity readings for extended periods unless the conditions warrant them.

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pH
The pH of the drip water should be applied at 5.2 to 5.8. The run off should be maintained at 5.3 to 6.3. If the pH is higher in the drip and run off solutions, Phosphoric Acid 81% should be added to the B solution at 1.0 L and then the pH monitored in the drip water and run off solution. If pH is still high continue to add Phosphoric Acid 81% gradually until 2.0 L of acid is used, further additions will require modifications to the feed solution supplied to plants to avoid oversupply of phosphorus.

Future B solutions will need to be modified to reduce the total amount of phosphorus supplied with use of 3.0 L of Phosphoric Acid 81%. For 1.0 L of Phosphoric Acid 81%, remove 1.5 kg of Mono Potassium Phosphate and add 1.0 kg of Potassium Sulphate to maintain similar phosphorus and potassium levels supplied in the liquid feed.

Never exceed 4.0 L of Phosphoric Acid 81%, seek further advice on long term pH management of the nutrient solution and run off to improve long term nutrient balance. High use of Phosphoric Acid 81% (>4.0 L) will require adjustment to the Mono Potassium Phosphate and Mono Ammonium Phosphate ratios to supply more ammonium nitrogen in the liquid feed and better long term pH control. In this regard it is advised to seek specialist assistance from a Technical Advisor to achieve optimum long term balance.

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Root Zone Environment
When modifying the pH and electrical conductivity of the run off solution to improve the root zone environment, make gradual changes to the feeding pattern with regard to feed volume, feed frequency and composition of the liquid feed. It is important to avoid onset of rapid changes in the root zone conditions as this can result in loss of plant control and flower quality.

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Irrigation
It is important to irrigate on demand to ensure that irrigation interacts with environmental conditions and plant requirements otherwise productivity can be jeopardised.

In general it is preferable to irrigate often in short irrigation cycles to maintain a similar balance in the root zone environment. Large and infrequent irrigation cycles can cause large fluctuations in root zone conditions between irrigation cycles leading to a poor environment for plant growth.

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Disclaimer
The information provided is given in good faith as a general guide only. Significant variation in local climate, greenhouse environment, cultural practices, variety, managerial conditions and other variables are likely to influence crop performance. No liability will be accepted by Galuku Pty Ltd or its representatives for the lack of perceived or actual performance in response to the information provided.

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